In Last-Minute Vote, LA County Leaders Approve Two-Month Extension Of COVID Renter Protections

With just one week left until COVID-19 eviction rules were set to expire, the L.A. County Board of Supervisors voted to extend protections through March 31.

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Stuckinthedays
Stuckinthedays
66 · 7 days ago · Reddit

after 3 years of not paying rent I would imagine they have enough saved up for a down payment to buy a home.

olympic87
olympic87
54 · 7 days ago · Reddit

0 reason to extend at this point. Not sure how this is legal. Also to clarify:

LA city voted to end the moratorium, but because LA County voted to extend it, that will apply to LA City also.

Nightsounds1
Nightsounds1
39 · 7 days ago · Reddit

typical LA rewarding bad behavior. If you don't have a job and can't pay your rent by now you have no intention of ever doing so.

fyacel
fyacel
38 · 6 days ago · Reddit

Genuinely curious, if a tenant hasn’t paid rent since March 2020, or really behind for any arbitrary period longer than 3 months, what does an extra 2 months moratorium do?

They magically find cash in the couch cushions to get caught up on payments and back on track?

FueledByHaribo
FueledByHaribo
32 · 7 days ago · Reddit

This is outrageous. One of the main reasons rent is so high is because there are so few apartments available due to this stupid eviction moratorium. Those of us who can pay rent and live in shitty apartments have nowhere to move to when our leases expire. If these people get evicted they can just move somewhere cheaper. Why do these people who are taking advantage of the system have the right to live in the 4th most expensive city in the world? They can move to Alabama for all I care

fizuk
fizuk
14 · 7 days ago · Reddit

The expiration could have left an estimated 226,000 households in the region with past-due rent vulnerable to eviction

This is the number of households that are behind on rent according to the census.

How many would be evicted is a little different but that's a huge amount of people. I read there's only a few million per year across the whole US typically

https://www.pnas.org/​doi/​10.1073/​pnas.2116169119