UCSF COVID doctor: Hospital surge isn't what you may think

Many public health officials have argued these measures are necessary to prevent hospitals from being overwhelmed with COVID patients. But fewer people are hospitalized with COVID today in California compared with this time last year. And,...

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janbrady501
janbrady501
130 · 6 days ago · Reddit

I think she is right about how most omicron cases in the Bay Area are mild and incidental (there for other things). Hospital I work at in East bay currently has none in the icu. The huge problem though is staffing shortages that were there already and now with everyone catching it and being out for 5-10 days anybody in the hospital for anything is f$cked. Not sure what the next few weeks will bring but it’s not good in hospitals now and has not been for several months, this is exacerbating it.

johnnysoup123
johnnysoup123
115 · 6 days ago · Reddit

My college buddy has been on a four year off the grid self sustaining complex with 11 other people up in Alaska. He is a real hippie freak with crunchy granola philosophies. He came back to California for New Years and I actually heard him ask his brother, “what is COVID 19?”

SillyMilk7
SillyMilk7
89 · 7 days ago · Reddit

Head of COVID response at UCSF: 'I have not intubated a single COVID patient during this Omicron surge'

Indeed, for the past few weeks, San Francisco hospitals have been in dire straits. But it’s not because people are sick — it’s because of staffing shortages driven by overly strict state quarantine rules, the director of COVID response at UCSF said.

After reviewing the charts of every COVID-positive patient at UCSF hospitals on Jan. 4, Dr. Jeanne Noble, an associate professor of emergency medicine at UCSF, determined that 70% of them were in the hospital for other reasons.

"The crisis from the Omicron peak is not generated by serious COVID illness in regions with highly vaxxed populations," Noble wrote in an email to SFGATE.

"The crisis we are suffering in the Bay Area is largely driven by disruptive COVID policies that encourage asymptomatic testing and subsequent quarantines. … The vast majority of COVID-plus patients I take care of need no medical care and are quickly discharged home with reassurance."

babyneedsaminute
babyneedsaminute
64 · 6 days ago · Reddit

I work in the UCSF ED and I cannot tell you how truly, truly awful and exhausting and demoralizing it is. We don’t have the staff, rooms or resources to care for the insane amount of people that come into the department each day. Admitted patients wait 60+ hours in ED rooms just to get a bed upstairs. We treat patients in hallways and discharge them from the waiting room. We regularly run out of supplies critical to patient care (“supply chain issues”). Staff morale is the lowest I’ve ever seen in my 8+ years in the ED. The administration does nothing to help the situation, because that would mean canceling elective surgeries which is how the hospital makes money. I am so, so depressed and dread going to work. We all feel the same way and sick calls are necessary just to keep your sanity. Burn out is very real and I don’t know how we’ll ever come back from it. I am interviewing for non-hospital jobs at the moment.

caliform
caliform
64 · 6 days ago · Reddit

Great article with an insider view putting numbers and current issues into perspective.

"The crisis from the Omicron peak is not generated by serious COVID illness in regions with highly vaxxed populations," Noble wrote in an email to SFGATE. "The crisis we are suffering in the Bay Area is largely driven by disruptive COVID policies that encourage asymptomatic testing and subsequent quarantines. … The vast majority of COVID-plus patients I take care of need no medical care and are quickly discharged home with reassurance."

cantquitreddit
cantquitreddit
55 · 7 days ago · Reddit

I've posted this multiple times, but can't resist one more:

After reviewing the charts of every COVID-positive patient at UCSF hospitals on Jan. 4, Dr. Jeanne Noble, an associate professor of emergency medicine at UCSF, determined that 70% of them were in the hospital for other reasons.

If 70% of hospitalized patients have incidental covid, that really calls into question why we're doing this whole song and dance. How many people are quarantining right now that don't have to? When are we going to treat this like 'if you're sick stay home, if you feel okay come in'?

danny841
danny841
35 · 6 days ago · Reddit

It's one ER department to be fair.

Also somewhat unrelated but if Monica Gandhi predicts the end of COVID again it means six more weeks of winter.

macavity_is_a_dog
macavity_is_a_dog
35 · 7 days ago · Reddit

Tonight I’ve got 2 covid pts - I’m an RN - I’ve got 4 total. Both these pts are not in the hospital for covid - they are in for two totally unrelated issues.

Tossawaysfbay
Tossawaysfbay
16 · 6 days ago · Reddit

Vaccinations + boosters work.

Water is wet.

More at 11.

ApprehensiveExit7
ApprehensiveExit7
15 · 6 days ago · Reddit

Lol I’m surprised this hasn’t been flagged or labeled misinformation

Clearwater27
Clearwater27
14 · 7 days ago · Reddit

I am glad she spoke about it. 100% agreed on the article.

edmchato
edmchato
9 · 6 days ago · Reddit

Great thread from UCSF's Medicine Chair on twitter: https://twitter.com/​Bob_Wachter/​status/​1480972956100534278

Bottom line: @UCSFhospitals has lots of Covid patients, at a time that hundreds of our docs & nurses are out with Covid. The stress level is very, very high.

So while it's true ICU case load is low, hospitals are still struggling at this point.

defauck
defauck
8 · 7 days ago · Reddit

Great news! Lets get this county and state back fully open soon!!

Heysteeevo
Heysteeevo
6 · 7 days ago · Reddit

This was the most optimistic I’ve felt after reading a COVID article in awhile. This is great news.

rioting-pacifist
rioting-pacifist
5 · 6 days ago · Reddit

TBF the policy ia sensible, but shouldn't be taken as an excuse for non-esential workers to not take Omicron seriously.

Seeing it compared to Florida's response of ignoring COVID is stupid.